Why Every Woman Should Have A Photo Shoot

I recently realized that I don’t have that many photos of myself. I have a few iPhone group selfies, a few with my man and a couple professional headshots I’ve had taken some time ago. As a makeup artist, I’m always the one making sure others look picture perfect.

If you’ve seen my website, you see tons of photos of beautiful women. And there’s only two of me. I’m never the one in front of the camera. In fact, I often hide from it.

I have tons of excuses:

  • I’m not in shape, so I’ll wait until I lose 15 pounds.
  • I have nothing to wear.
  • I’m not photogenic. I don’t know what to do in front of the camera.
  • I feel awkward.

And it goes on and on. My dear friend and stylist Melanie has been telling me for AGES to have a new shoot.

I finally decided to bite the bullet and go for it!  I'm SO glad I did.  One that shows who I am, the woman behind the makeup brushes!

I had no idea what I wanted my photos to look like, so I left it in the hands of Melanie, who did triple duty as Creative Director, Modeling Coach and Stylist of my shoot.

I woke up so nervous the day of my shoot. I seriously considered cancelling it because I was afraid of having my photo taken. But with Melanie and Krista’s (my awesome photographer) help, I actually had a great time and have photos that I loved.

Here are some important lessons I learned from having my own photo shoot.

  1. Find a couple outfits you feel fabulous in. Melanie, my dear friend, is an amazing stylist who took me shopping to find fun clothes that fit my style. But you don’t have to have a stylist on speed dial to find outfits that will look great on you. Go to your favorite store and ask the most stylish worker there to help you find something great. Find a celeb whom you admire and has a similar body type as you for inspiration. Raid your best friend’s closet for something new (and free) to mix
    with your own pieces.
  2. Get your hair and makeup professionally done. You’ll feel gorgeous, and you won’t be stressed over your hair looking perfect. As a pro makeup and hair artist, I decided to do my own. But I was so nervous all morning that I wished I would’ve made an appointment to have someone else do it. Having another person pamper me always relaxes me.
  3. Relax and enjoy yourself! Your photographer has you! She (or he) will help coach you through your nervousness. She will direct you in a way so you always look your thinnest (and your best!). And once you’ve relaxed, you can actually start to have fun! Pretend you’re Taylor Swift getting photographed for Allure magazine, and work it for the camera.
  4. Let go of all your insecurities, and be confident in your beauty. We all have tummies that we think aren’t flat, or laugh lines that we think are too deep. (Or is that just me?). Let all that go and feel good about yourself. You will show up in your photos as a beautiful, confident woman, wrinkles and all.
  5. When you get your photos back, concentrate on what you love about them, not what you hate. In the past I would spend so much time picking apart how I looked in photos. But when I started focusing on what I loved about them, it helped me love my photos more. And if you are having trouble, show them to your best friend. She’ll help you appreciate your best assets. And she’ll pick out the ones where you look your best.

By the end of the day, I realized that I felt great about myself. I felt beautiful and confident. And the most surprising thing was I was actually having fun! I haven’t added my new photos yet to my site, but I wanted to share them with you first. I’m excited that they show off my style and personality. Most of all they feel like me. I’m no longer afraid of having my photo taken. In fact, I’m excited to schedule my next shoot.

In the comments below, I’d love to hear from you about your experiences having your photo taken. What helps you feel confident in a photo shoot? Or what are your hesitations in scheduling one? I’d love to hear from you.

xo,

Melissa

photos by Krista Marie Photography, Styling by Melanie Kluger